The Survival Horror Museum

Welcome to the Survival Fiction Museum. Feel free to browse and explore. Be adventurous. Don’t worry about touching the exhibits—and don’t be afraid if some of the exhibits touch back. Just a  bit of survival fiction humor there. Come on in. The road flares are there to guide you through quickly.
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We have several exhibits open now, and hope to expand within the coming season. During the museum’s initial construction, several people were confused exactly what was meant by the term survival fiction.

Perhaps a glance at the plaque by the front door will help.
“Survival Fiction—a genre focusing on people in sitatuations and environments where most action is centered around efforts to overcome the resultant physical and emotional challenges.”

It’s a broad definition. Perhaps a better answer can be found in the addage, “I don’t know how to explain survival fiction, but I know it when I see it.”
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Sure, some folks are content to call it apocalyptic fiction. Others dismissively wave the zombie flag. However refusal to acknowledge the genre’s depth and richness doesn’t minimize its lasting impact to American and world culture.
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At this point our museum has three wings, although a few more are currently under construction. The Zombie wing is quite large these days, and houses the George Romero Theater. You’ll find show times and attractions in your brochure. I believe currently running is Frakenstein. Many people are surprised by the inclusion of Shelley’s creation in this wing, but isn’t the animation of dead flesh part at the heart of the zombie legend? If you’re interested, the late night showing is in “Voodoo Vision.”
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The second wing, and perhaps the largest at this point, is the Cold War Wing. That’s where you’ll find a diorama dedicated to Ellison’s “A Boy And His Dog,” and an interactive laser show fashioned after Zelazny’s Damnation Alley.  We also feature robotic figures acting out scenes from   Pat Frank’s Alas, Babylon, and Nevil Shute’s On The Beach. Entrance to the wing is through the Ayn Rand Memorial Bomb Shelter.
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The third wing is the Diaspora Wing. Stephen King’s The Stand is there, along with McCarthy’s The Road, two very different entrees. You’ll also find John Christopher’s No Blade of Grass represented. Along with John Wyndham’s The Day of the Triffids. Plus, Margaret Atwood’s A Handmaiden’s Tale.
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Our displays are quite varied. We also have a new youth outreach program. The Lord of the Flies Activities Trailer is winding its way through selected neighborhoods. Just listen for the conch horn and sound of kids at play.
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I’ve only touched on the hundreds of displays and artifacts we have. And don’t forget to visit the Capt. Trip’s Gift Shop and The Birds Eatery on the way out. You’ll love the Hitchcock Burger and King salad.

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